Why the Green New Deal is a Response to the European Debt Crisis

Why the Green New Deal is a Response to the European Debt Crisis

Oct 13, 2011

Policy Paper

Why the Green New Deal is a Response to the European Debt Crisis

 

October 13, 2011
Gerhard Schick
The global economic crisis has not been overcome; its character has merely changed. For us parliamentarians, its most tangible characteristic is the smoldering debt crisis in some Euro countries. Similar to the crisis in the banking sector, the European government debt crisis is typical of a large-scale financial crisis, the “Second Great Depression,” and managing it has to be addressed in this context. If it were only an uncontrolled government debt accumulation in Europe, then it would now be appropriate to simply apply debt brakes to manage the public debt, and to work with stronger sanction options. But would this have prevented the problems in Ireland or Spain? No. The financial crises in Spain and Ireland have absolutely nothing to do with government irresponsibly incurring debt. The government debt only increased when the government had to react to the excessive indebtedness of the private households and banks that it had previously permitted.

The conservative reinterpretation of the debt crisis as a purely governmental debt crisis due to excessive government spending is politically smart but factually incorrect. Drastic austerity programs alone are therefore not very useful in overcoming the crisis. On the contrary, the current crisis policy aggravates the crisis in many areas.

Click here to read Why the Green New Deal is a Response to the European Debt Crisis (14 pages, pdf, 513KB)

 
 
 
 

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