Finance, Development & G20

Finance, Development & G20


This program monitors and encourages citizens’ participation in power shifts and trends that shape economic governance. The West and the institutions it leads (e.g., the World Bank) face greater competition, and emerging market countries, their existing and new institutions (e.g., the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank) and state-owned enterprises are gaining clout. At the same time, transnational corporations exert more influence (relative to governments and citizens) over governance, especially trade and investment rules. Regional institutions and “club governance” such as the G20, G7 and the BRICS countries play bolder roles in global governance. These trends are especially evident in the race to build infrastructure (e.g., energy, transport, water) to access natural resources and markets. This program explicitly encourages citizens’ participation in developing infrastructure and investment rules that serve humanity and the planet in sustainable ways.

The G20 & BRICS

The G20 & BRICS

This resource library features our work the G20 and BRICS, including official documents, civil society inputs, analysis on future and past summits, and insights into working groups such as the B20 and T20.

History of the G20 & BRICS

From 2010 - 2015, the Heinrich Böll Foundation published a quarterly newsletter on the G20 Summit processes and outcomes with special emphasis on the contributions to the processes by civil society organizations.

Focus on G20

This dossier hosted by our headquarters regularly presents new analysis and basic facts about the G20, including on the individual member countries, specific themes, and the G20 engagement groups.

Publications on Finance, Development, & G20

Contracts for Sustainable Infrastructure


Infrastructure is essential to the achievement of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and to the success of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Our partner IISD presents why governments must invest in sustainable infrastructure and how they can integrate sustainability into infrastructure contracts.

An Energy Agenda for the G20 as if the Future Mattered

The G20 has fallen behind other international organizations in addressing the challenges of climate change and supporting sustainable energy transformation and electrification. This article lays the foundation for a reflection and discussion on what the G20 can usefully do to support these transformations, and how it must change to achieve this.
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