Economic Governance & G20

Economic Governance & G20

The Economic Governance Program focuses on democratizing governance structures to ensure that the international financial institutions and bodies, such as the G20 and BRICS, are representative and accountable. It also works on democratizing policy-making in thematic areas (e.g., finance, economics and trade) and sectoral areas (e.g., infrastructure) to strengthen “real economies” in ways that respect the rights of the earth, vulnerable groups, and women. We support the engagement of citizen’s groups in developing countries in both areas, including through  public education and capacity-building.

Finance, Development, and G20

Understanding the financialisation of international development through 11 FAQs

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This article explores how growth of the finance sector can overtake growth in the "real" economy, including manufacturing or trade, and depress wages as returns to capital are protected or increased. In developing and emerging countries, financialisation deepens the vulnerability of local financial systems when they are subject to the volatility of global capital markets and the interest rate decisions of large countries, particularly the US. Without proper controls, financialization can redirect the development process towards securing the profits of private companies and private finance.

Focus on G20

This dossier hosted by our headquarters regularly presents new analysis and basic facts about the G20, including on the individual member countries, specific themes, and the G20 engagement groups.

The G20 & BRICS

This resource library features our work the G20 and BRICS, including official documents, civil society inputs, analysis on future and past summits, and insights into working groups such as the B20 and T20.

History of the G20 & BRICS

From 2010 - 2015, the Heinrich Böll Foundation published a quarterly newsletter on the G20 Summit processes and outcomes with special emphasis on the contributions to the processes by civil society organizations.

Economic Governance

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB): A Multilateral Bank Where China Sets the Rules

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Study

In recent years, a number of countries have chosen to join the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), which has become a major player in the global financial architecture in record time. The AIIB promises to be "lean, clean and green". In truth, it seems to be an instrument to promote Chinese interests. The analysis of Korinna Horta after three years of AIIB is very sobering. What can you do now? Is it time to acknowledge a total failure and leave the bank? What influence do shareholders still have and what should they push for?

Staff

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