G20 and BRICS Update

G20 and BRICS Update

The Heinrich Böll Foundation publishes a quarterly newsletter, the “G20-BRICS Update,” on the G20 Summit processes and outcomes with special emphasis on the contributions to the processes by civil society organizations.

This issue highlights safeguards, global financial instability and fragility, Turkey's economy and fossil fuel subsidies, and the tension between G20 and UN leadership on infrastructure.

This issue entitled, "Will the New G20 Troika Advance Sustainable Development?" includes feature articles on Public-Private Partnerships (will they help achieve climate and sustainable development goals?); the Turkish Civil 20; and ragged progress on the G20 Anti-Corruption agenda.

This issue of the G20-BRICS Update covers the hopes and fears for the G20 Summit in November 2014; outcomes of the BRICS Summit in July 2014; the G20's Global Infrastructure Initiative; and Korea's experience with public-private partnerships (PPP)s.

In this special issue of the G20-BRICS Update, scholars and activists share views on the potential of the BRICS and their new initiatives.

Read about the jobs crisis, mobilizing pension funds to underwrite infrastructure, the need for a new “model” for BRICS’ development, and the ambitions and risks of African mega-projects.

The February 2014 "G20-BRICS Update" features articles on the Australian G20 Presidency by Senator Christine Milne and Alan Alexandroff; articles on the BRICS by Graciela Rodriguez and Oliver Stuenkel (Brazil) and Vitaliy Kartamyshev (Russia); and reviews of work by Jayati Ghosh and Observer Research Foundation (India).

At the September 2013 G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Leaders faced
conflicts relating to the Syrian crisis and decelerating global growth and,
particularly, the role of the monetary policies of advanced countries,
especially the U.S., in destabilizing developing country ́s economies.

This issue of the “G20 Update” includes articles on three questions:1) What is the nature of the upsurge of investigations of, and attacks on, Russian civil society? 2) Why has the G20 launched a new initiative on “financing for investment”? 3) How do the policy agendas of the G8 and G20 converge?

This issue features articles on  the G20 exclusion of African perspectives, the story of Russia’s CivilG8–2006 Project, the parade of “20” meetings, the G20’s Anti-Corruption Working Group and includes a “knowledge box” on “The `Enough’ Campaign and the G8’s New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition.

On December 1, 2012, the G20 welcomed its new leadership “troika”– Russia, Mexico, and Australia – the current, past and future presidents, respectively. The Russian G20 Presidency has announced its priorities for the 2013 Summit.G20 Sherpas, or presidential aides, will meet in Moscow in mid-December. At the same time, civil society, think tanks, and business leaders will gather to hammer out recommendations to present to the Sherpas.

Pages