Sustainable Mobility and Technology in the United States

Sustainable Mobility in the United States: Challenges & Opportunities from New Technologies

For free
In collaboration with the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University the Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung Washington, DC hosted a group of four Master students for a research practicum. We are happy to present the research on Sustainable Mobility in the United States: Challenges & Opportunities from New Technologies by Simran Borade, Kathleen Cohen, Chantal Davis and Jake Stockman. The report provides an overview of mobility trends and contains case studies of different policy approaches in two cities (Pittsburgh and Washington, DC) and two states (California and Michigan).
Product details
Date of Publication
Spring 2020
Number of Pages
69
Licence
All rights reserved.
Language of publication
English
Table of contents

1 Executive Summary 4

2 Introduction 5

3 Methodology 7

4 Mobility Trends in the United States 8

4.1 Passenger Vehicles 8

4.2 Demographic Changes 9

5 Electric Vehicles 10

5.1 Electric Vehicle Adoption in the United States 10

5.2 EVs and the Electricity Grid 11

5.3 Sustainability Implications 12

5.4 Equity Implications 13

5.5 Federal Policy and EVs 13

6 Shared Mobility 15

6.1 Shared Mobility Adoption in the United States 15

6.1.1 Ride-hailing with Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) 15

6.1.2 Micromobility 16

6.2 Sustainability Implications 17

6.3 Equity Implications 17

6.4 Federal Policy and Shared Mobility 18

7 Autonomous Vehicles 19

7.1 Autonomous Vehicle Adoption in the US 19

7.1.1 Consumer Perceptions 20

7.2 Sustainability Implications 21

7.3 Equity Implications 22

7.4 Federal Policy and AVs 23

8 Data Privacy 24

9 Case Studies 25

9.1 California 25

9.1.1 Climate Policies 26

9.1.2 Electric Vehicles 26

9.1.2.1 Consumer Incentives 27

9.1.2.2 Charging Infrastructure 27

9.1.3 Shared Mobility 28

9.1.3.1 Ride-hailing with TNCs 28

9.1.3.2 Micromobility 29

9.1.3.3 Data Privacy 30

9.1.4 Autonomous Vehicles 32

9.2 Michigan 32

9.2.1 Electric Vehicles 33

9.2.1.1 Private Sector Initiatives 33

9.2.1.2 State Initiatives 34

9.2.1.3 Utility Initiatives 35

9.2.1.4 Future policies in Michigan 36

9.2.2 Shared Mobility 36

9.2.2.1 State Initiatives 36

9.2.2.2 Ride-hailing with TNCs 37

9.2.2.3 Micromobility 37

9.2.3 Autonomous Vehicles 38

9.2.3.1 Private Sector Initiatives 38

9.2.3.2 State Initiatives 39

9.2.3.3 Data Privacy 39

9.3 Washington, DC 40

9.3.1 Administrative Structure 40

9.3.2 Transit Initiatives 41

9.3.3 Electric Vehicles 42

9.3.4 Shared Mobility 43

9.3.4.1 Ride-hailing with TNCs 43

9.3.4.2 Micromobility 45

9.3.5 Autonomous Vehicles 47

9.4 Pittsburgh 47

9.4.1 Transit Initiatives 49

9.4.2 Electric Vehicles 51

9.4.3 Shared Mobility 51

9.4.3.1 Micromobility 51

9.4.4 Autonomous Vehicles 52

10 Conclusions 53

10.1 Sustainability 53

10.2 Equity 55

10.3 Data Privacy 56

10.4 Policy Approaches 58

Bibliography 61