Development Finance

This program monitors and encourages citizens’ participation in power shifts and trends that shape economic governance. The West and the institutions it leads (e.g., the World Bank) face greater competition, and emerging market countries, their existing and new institutions (e.g., the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank) and state-owned enterprises are gaining clout. At the same time, transnational corporations exert more influence (relative to governments and citizens) over governance, especially trade and investment rules. Regional institutions and “club governance” such as the G20, G7 and the BRICS countries play bolder roles in global governance. These trends are especially evident in the race to build infrastructure (e.g., energy, transport, water) to access natural resources and markets. This program explicitly encourages citizens’ participation in developing infrastructure and investment rules that serve humanity and the planet in sustainable ways.

The World Bank: In the vanguard of an infrastructure boom

What Role for Development Finance in the Future of Africa and the Global South

What Role for Development Finance in the Future of Africa and the Global South?

All Finance, Development and G20

Publications on Finance, Development, & G20

Understanding the financialisation of international development through 11 FAQs

This article explores how growth of the finance sector can overtake growth in the "real" economy, including manufacturing or trade, and depress wages as returns to capital are protected or increased. In developing and emerging countries, financialisation deepens the vulnerability of local financial systems when they are subject to the volatility of global capital markets and the interest rate decisions of large countries, particularly the US. Without proper controls, financialization can redirect the development process towards securing the profits of private companies and private finance.